Translating evidence into practice to prevent central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections: a systems-based intervention

Young E, Commiskey M, Wilson S. Translating evidence into practice to prevent central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections: a systems-based intervention. American Journal of Infection Control. 2006;34(8):503-506.

Background: The central venous catheter (CVC) is a necessary, yet inherently risky, modern medical device. We aimed to carry out a systems-based intervention designed to facilitate the use of maximal
sterile barrier precautions and the use of chlorhexidine for skin antisepsis during insertion of CVC.
Methods: All patients in whom a CVC was inserted at a medical-surgical intensive care unit at a university affiliated public hospital were included in a before-after trial. The standard CVC kit in routine use before the
intervention included a small sterile drape (24” by 36”) and 10 percent povidone-iodine for skin antisepsis. We special ordered a customized kit that, instead, included a large sterile drape (41” by 55”) and 2 percent
chlorhexidine gluconate in 70 percent isopropyl alcohol. Both the standard kit in use before the intervention and the customized kit included identical CVCs. Baseline data included the quarterly  VC-associated bloodstream infection (BSI) rates during the 15 months before the intervention. Comparison data included the quarterly CVC associated BSI rates during the 15 months after we instituted exclusive use of the customized kit.
Results: The mean quarterly CVC-associated BSI rate decreased from a baseline of 11.3 per 1000 CVC-days before the intervention to 3.7 per 1000 CVC-days after the intervention (P < .01). Assuming direct costs of at least 10,000 dollars per CVC-associated BSI, we calculated resultant annualized savings to the hospital of approximately 350,000 dollars.
Conclusion: Infection control interventions that rely on voluntary changes in human behavior, despite the best intentions of us all, are often unsuccessful. We have demonstrated that a systems-based intervention led to a sustained decrease in the CVC-associated BSI rate, thereby resulting in improved patient safety and decreased cost of care.

Link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.